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Scots pine

PINUS SYLVESTRIS

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Scots pine

PINUS SYLVESTRIS

trees

Scots pine is an evergreen coniferous tree, growing 15-30 meters high. Its crown is wide and conical. Pine needles are 3-6 cm long and paired. Its yellow-brown cones come in bundles of up to 3 pieces. Pine trees grow a taproot deep into the ground, making it very resistant to storms.

The Scots pine grows in sunny, dry heath- and peat forests, groves; on rocks, ridges, and morass. It flourishes all over Europe and Eastern Siberia.

Pine has always been important historically and culturally, both in tradition and in practice. In addition to its valuable wood, the Scots pine is also used as an herbal remedy and medicine. A drink extracted from pine is sold at health food stores, while the young shoots are rich in vitamin C. It has been burned to produce tar; and, in times of scarcity, it has been ground as flour to make bread.

The Scots pine is the most common tree species in Finland and its use in forestry is extensive. In the pulp and paper industry, pine is used as raw material for softwood pulp. Sawn timber from pines is well-suited for construction and furniture-making.

Old trees have a thick shield bark, which protects the pine trees against forest fires. Deer, insects and moles can harm cultivated seedlings; but in general, pine is highly resistant to damage. Pine trees are long-lived, from 200 to 300 years. In Lapland there are pine trees that are 800 years old.

Scots pine

PINUS SYLVESTRIS

wooddeadwoodstage of developmentkey biotopes
aspen
aspen
1-5y
grove
birch
birch
6-20y
ridge
pine
pine
21-50y
rock
spruce
spruce
51-100y
spring
other
other
stream
swamp
Essential success factor
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